Mar 31

Top Tip

Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming “Wow! What a Ride!”
Hunter S Thompson

Mar 31

March 2018

Our March meeting was full of lively chatter, bringing the sun out and giving a warm feeling which ignored the ice and snow outside.
Show and tell included a crocheted Easter bunny nibbling on a needle felted carrot; a beautiful knitted blue tit; embroidered and beaded brooches of seahorse and owl; the beginnings of a cosy knitted shawl and some stunning paper quilled greetings cards. A lovely photo of grand-daughters enjoying their knitted hooded jackets was also shared.
Individual projects were much in evidence with knitting, crochet and counted thread work being undertaken along with the completion of some small stitched gift items.
The optional workshop gave people the chance to try their hand at Sashiko. This craft began life centuries ago as a rural domestic craft in Northern Japan. Originally used for recycling and warmth by strengthening work clothes and household goods. Reusing textiles has a long tradition in the poorer rural communities in Japan. The craft of Sashiko was handed down from mother to daughter in farming and fishing communities and helped to instil the values of patience and perseverance which were deemed to be essential qualities for a farmer’s wife! Traditional Sashiko combines 2 or 3 layers of indigo dyed cotton or linen fabric and is worked in white thread using a simple running stitch.
For our practice sample a small square was Sashiko stitched in a design of choice ready to be turned into a useful coaster.
Next month there will be an optional workshop on how to make a Kanzashi fabric flower. Please bring a small sewing kit if you have one.
Next meeting: Monday 16 April 2 – 4pm at Ashford Carbonel village hall. Everyone welcome.
Janice Forsyth 831437

Mar 31

Ludlow Garden Club – Mar 2018

Monty Don was hopeful that he had seen the last of the snow…. little did he know what was going to happen two or three days later. I hope by the time you read this Spring will have sprung in earnest!
You may have found that sadly some replenishments are need to fill in gaps …. plants that could not cope with 3 coverings of snow and a frost to boot.
On Wednesday April 18th we have our annual plant sale so come and pick a bargain of “home grown” plants, there will be plants of all sizes for house and garden. This is also the A.G.M. sandwiched between the first round of the sale and the Auction when the REAL bargains are found! The meeting starts at 7:30 pm at St. Peters Centre, if you need any further information or a lift please contact me: Susannah 711006

Mar 31

March 2018

The new style of cafe seating we trialled for our meetings has proved a great success. Chris, our president, had to give her gavel a few heavy bangs before she could bring us all to order and welcome members to the March meeting. Our talented group of ‘Show’ ladies are gluttons for punishment as they are again entering both the Shrewsbury Flower Show, where the chosen category is Hobbies, and the Burwarton Show where they have to produce a Story Sack. Although the category is set, it is up to the group to use their skill, imagination and artistry to produce and stage their entry in a way that will catch the judges eye. Caynham Ashford have done very well in the past and I’m sure this year will be no exception. Ann and Sue are getting the outings sorted and trying to accommodate everybody. There are various possibilities in the pipeline including a visit to BBC Birmingham and a trip to St Fagans. Nine of us went to the cinema to see Phantom Thread, we all enjoyed the evening but left the cinema somewhat bemused. The April film choice is Finding Your Feet which I think we will find a little more light hearted. Our Plastic Soup Warriors have held another meeting and produced a flyer for members with a few thought provoking facts on man made materials and some tips on how to minimise microplastic fibre release when washing our clothes. Continuing with this Eco Friendly theme our speaker for the evening was Alice Evans who with her husband Ian have run The Broad Bean in Ludlow for just over two years. The Broad Bean has previously been known as a Wholefood Shop but Alice and Ian are continually working to expand the business by supplying a very wide range of products, plus delicious delicatessen foods. They are working very hard to source products, wherever possible, that have recyclable packaging and encourage you to take your own containers to be refilled. It is certainly a step forward when we see how much plastic is used in the packaging of our weekly supermarket shop. It has also been reported that more people are going back to having their milk delivered by the milkman thus eliminating plastic bottles and reverting to glass. The vote of thanks was given by Betty Meredith. Our next meeting is at Ashford on the 11th April and the speaker is Simon Martin on Storytelling. The competition is a poem, a verse or a short story. Everybody welcome. Sandra Warner

Mar 31

Ludlow Museum

Ludlow Museum will soon need a group of volunteers to sew labels into items of the Costume Collection at the Resource Centre in Ludlow. Sewing will likely take place on a Wednesday.
At this stage, we are looking for expressions of interest.
If you are interested, and think your sewing skills are up to the challenge, then simply email Abigail.Cox@shropshire.gov.uk with the subject heading ‘Potential Sewer’. You will then be added to an emailing list.
Once we have worked out details such as a date and time for this sewing to take place, we will email you asking if you are still willing and able to volunteer on this project.

Mar 31

Alderney: Fortress Island

Alderney is only a small island, approximately three miles long and a mile and an half wide, but it is crammed with fortifications. The earliest is a Roman fort / trading post at Longis Bay which subsequently became a nunnery, German gun emplacement and private house amongst other incarnations. At the end of the first millennia the island was part of the Duchy of Normandy, and accidentally became British when Duke William swam the Channel. The Tudors had a building spree with at least four castles and then the Victorians became edgy, the French getting uppity again, and built about a dozen forts. All this was dwarfed (in number rather than size) by the Germans in the Second World War. Not only that, but the Germans converted the island into a giant concentration camp, intending, so it is said, to house the great and the good of Britain after Hitler had invaded. I doubt if there is anywhere on the island where you are out of sight of some form of military remains. And yet Alderney has a peace and charm that is totally at odds with its war-like heritage. The coast is beautiful with a mixture of low, rugged cliffs, sheltered sandy bays, a few patches of marshland and hundreds of rocky islets off the coast. A bird watcher’s paradise. To the east the French coast is usually quite clear, Alderney being level with Cap de la Hague, and Guernsey and Jersey are misty smudges on the southern horizon. St Anne’s, the one and only town, has the feel of a small English market town of the 1930s, probably somewhere in Devon. This despite the architecture being slightly continental. The annual island fete is held at Longis Bay, close to the old Roman fort. My son, Edward, and I came across it by accident last year while walking round the coast, clambering over a bank into the fete field. Most people seemed to be arriving on foot from all points of the compass. A curious mixture of traditional English village fete, bygone agricultural show and a few innovations – even the Thai restaurant from St Anne’s had a stall (very well attended too!). Edward and I couldn’t cope with the unaccustomed mass of people (at least 300) and so nipped round the corner to a little restaurant / café and had a very pleasant lunch in their Mediterranean style garden.
Matthew Brundret

Mar 31

Do you have a few hours to help a local baby bereavement Group?

Do you have a few hours a month to help a local baby bereavement Group?
Losing your much longed for baby during pregnancy or soon after birth is the most awful trauma any parent can experience.
Members of Shropshire Sands (Stillbirth and neonatal death charity) support group are appealing to the local community to help them find new volunteers to join their committee. Committee roles include Chairperson, Treasurer, Secretary, Hospital Liaison and Fundraising Coordinator.
Whilst many Sands volunteers have themselves experienced the death of the baby you do not have to have personal experience of baby loss in order to offer help to the committee. As long as you have an empathy and interest in Sands’ work we would urge you to get involved. Guidance, support and resources are provided to volunteers by UK-Sands and the local Network Coordinator.
For further information on the roles or to find out more about the group contact Nathalya Kennedy, West Network Coordinator at Sands on 07833491603 or
email: nathalya.kennedy@sands.org.uk

Mar 31

Choosing Care is one of life’s most stressful decisions

Healthwatch Shropshire is supporting #CareAware, a national campaign launched by the Care Quality Commis-sion (CQC). The campaign followed a survey that showed that 70% of people found choosing care to be one of life’s most stressful life decisions compared to other life events, such as choosing their child’s school or getting married.
Healthwatch Shropshire is keen to highlight the resources that are freely available to everybody who is facing the decision of choosing care, domestic or residential.
Healthwatch Shropshire carries out Enter & View visits to Care homes and publishes reports. Enter & View gives a voice to the people using a service and asks them what they think of the service they receive. It looks at whether a service works for the people using it. The reports are available on http://www.healthwatchshropshire.co.uk/news/careaware along with links to CQC tips to help people choose a care provider; CQC inspection reports which can provide additional help; and a guide in five steps to choosing a Care Home produced by Healthwatch England along with eight indicators of a good quality home.
Healthwatch Shropshire is the independent consumer champion for health and social care in Shropshire. It gathers the views and experiences of patients, service users, carers, and the general public about services including hospitals, GPs, mental health services, community health services, pharmacists, opticians, residential care and children’s services. It also has statutory powers that it can use to influence service provision by encouraging improvements.
It has a team working in community engagement, plus a volunteer programme, a visit programme to health and social care premises and an associate membership scheme to involve the public in its work. It also has a signposting service to help people access health and social care services and support.
Healthwatch Shropshire also provides the Independent Health Complaints Advocacy Service (IHCAS) for Shropshire. The IHCAS service provides information, advice and, if necessary, can support people through the NHS complaints process.
Contact: Jane Randall-Smith, Chief Officer Healthwatch Shropshire. Tel: 01743 237884
Email enquiries@healthwatchshropshire.co.uk Website: www.healthwatchshropshire.co.uk

Mar 31

Nick the Snow Plough

We have all heard of Fireman Sam, Bob the Builder and Postman Pat, but have you heard of Nick the Snow Plough? He is Ashford’s very own amazing Chap who worked tirelessly for 48 hours clearing all our lanes and by roads from Bromfield to The Goggin, up the Clee, into Ludlow and towards Tenbury. As soon as he’d finished he started again as the snow was persistently falling. He stopped to grab some food, get a little sleep and Chair a Village meeting, but there was no time for anything else. Thanks to Nick the emergency services could get through. Thanks to Nick the school opened on Monday morning with a clear car park. Thanks to Nick we could all start traveling as soon as it began to thaw. So Nick, from us all, thank you for keeping us safe.

Mar 31

Calling all bakers

Ladies (and gentlemen too) we need volunteers to bake cakes, scones, tray bakes and biscuits to serve to the visitors to the Ashford Carbonel Gardens Open to be held on Sunday June 24th.
We will also need volunteers to help to serve the teas on a rota basis between 1pm and 6pm.
If you think you could help out, please contact Julia Hall 877675 or Maureen Round 831542
Nick the

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